The Parable of the Blobs and Squares

| Helen Sharp

One of the most challenging aspects of changing the approach we take in our work, is helping other people truly understand what it is we’re trying to do and why and then bringing them along with us. I have found film to be a very useful medium in this situation – it stops me proselytising and gives them something different to look at, often something inspiring and thought-provoking.

The best introductory film that I have used is ‘The Parable of the Blobs and Squares’ – a very clever animation, narrated by Brian Blessed which combines humour with honesty without the blame culture. I’ve found that I can use this film with everyone, from senior leaders to community members. Check it out.

Edgar Cahn’s book No More Throw-Away People relates the parable of the Blobs and Squares to explain the co-production imperative. This video co-produced by Time Banking UK retells the story.

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